How many children are currently being served by each PromisePath country?

Each country is different. The total children being served across the four PromisePath countries is over 2,500.  

Do children have to actively have a parent in prison to participate, or can the parent be recently released?

The eligibility requirements state that a child has a parent who is incarcerated – this can include pre-trial detention and house arrest, if they are prevented from working. Children are ineligible for the program when the national ministry determines they no longer need support and/or upon graduation from secondary school. 

What is the size of the program and what are the upcoming countries to launch PromisePath?

Currently four countries are serving more than 2,500 children. In this coming year, we are looking to add five new countries and hope to serve 5,000 children. We have a pipeline of countries who have been identified; however, the launch timeline and locations can change based on a variety of circumstances. 

Are there resources for the caregivers, or just the children?

Scriptural resources are also provided to Caregivers. Additionally, it is understood that Caregivers will attend the Angel Tree and back-to-school events with their children, giving them an opportunity to connect with other Caregivers who understand the unique and difficult situation that they are facing. We are also hoping that because mentors are coming from local churches, they will develop supportive friendships with Caregivers, and help them connect to a local church family. 

Do the families sign release forms?

Yes. National ministries must obtain informed consent from the child’s guardian in order for the child to participate in the program. 

How does the field team confirm the children who are registered and that they are attending program activities?

The national ministries must take attendance at events and attendance records are presented at Prison Fellowship International audits every six months. The National Ministry teams are empowered to achieve the child-centric outcomes based on the requirements of the incarcerated parent needing to be part of the program, the child needing to be in school and their required participation in program activities and events.  

Is an Angel Tree gift included in the $65 per child?

No. The Angel Tree event is hosted by the National Ministry as a way to register children into the PromisePath program. Gifts, games and activities during that event are all taken care of by the National Ministry team and other donations or strategic partnerships the ministry has. $65 per child registers the child into the program, ensures they receive necessary materials and funding for school, as well as access to scripture resources and the mentoring engagement. If the National Ministry has additional funding outside of the $65, they will determine the best way to provide additional items for the children.  

What exactly are “educational resources”?

The National Ministry partners are empowered to use grant funding to best provide for the educational needs of the children that they serve.  Some children may get school fees, some may get uniforms, and some may get both. All children in the PromisePath program will receive a school kit with school supplies such as notebooks, pencils, paper etc. 

Are there school visits? How do the teams confirm the children are participating in school?

No. National Ministry teams do not physically visit the schools. They confirm through their relationship with the parent and from information gathered during mentoring sessions. Rather than having the program staff pay the families directly for school fees and uniforms, in most cases, the funding is given directly to the schools. The school then arranges for the uniforms to be paid for with vouchers or they make arrangements with entities who provide the uniforms. While this does not absolutely ensure the kids are attending schools, it is another check to have in place. 

How are mentors identified, vetted and deployed to help the families?

Mentors are identified through the National Ministry’s volunteer network, as well as through local church partnerships and relationships. They are required to undergo an application process, including a pastor’s recommendation, and they must sign the confidentiality policy which includes our child protection policy. Mentors complete an annual training before engaging with children, which includes child protection training, the training on the use of scriptural materials and mentorship best practices. National ministries then determine how Mentors and children are matched.